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Archive for November, 2012

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Part III

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• FOOTAGE ABOUT TROOP TEST SMOKEY

 

NARRATOR:

“Well, we knew now exactly where we’d be for the big show. All we had to do was wait.  Now that it’s so close, it makes you feel kind of restless. You wonder if everything’s going to turn out all right. It filled your mind no matter what you were doing.”

CHAPLAIN:

“What seems to be the trouble, soldier. You look a little bit worried.”

1st SOLDIER:

“Well I am chaplain. Just a little bit.”

CHAPLAIN:

“Actually there’s no need to be worried as the Army has taken all of the necessary precautions to see that we’re perfectly safe here.”

2nd SOLDIER:

“Sir, have you ever been out on one of these shots before?”

CHAPLAIN:

“Yes, I’ve had the opportunity to see a number of the atomic tests.  I feel that as a chaplain it is my responsibility to be with my men.”

1st SOLDIER:

“What’s it like, Chaplain?

CHAPLAIN:

“First of all, one sees a very, very bright light, followed by a shock wave. Then you hear the sound of the blast, and then it seems as though there is a minor earthquake. And then you look up and you see the fireball as it ascends up into the heavens. It’s a wonderful sight to behold.”

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• FOOTAGE OF ACTUAL TROOP TEST SMOKEY BLAST

COUNTDOWN:

“Thirty seconds. Fifteen seconds. Ten seconds.  Five, four, three, two, one…”

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ANNOUNCER:

“The blast shock passes in a matter of seconds, and the heat and blast effects you can see and feel. You cannot sense the presence of nuclear radiation effects.”

“Alpha and beta particles are stopped by most surfaces. Even a soldier’s skin. They are a hazard only when materials emitting these particles get into the body through breaks in the skin, or through the nose or mouth.”

1st INTERVIEWER:

“Did you keep your mouth shut or did you get a mouthful of dirt?”

1st SOLDIER:

“I got a mouthful and faceful of dirt.”

2nd INTERVIEWER:

“How about all that smoke and dust and radiation. What did you see?

2nd SOLDIER:

“I couldn’t see. I couldn’t see for quite a spell. Just a haze.”

3rd INTERVIEWER:

“Private Young, did you wear any type of protective clothing? Just what did you wear?”

3rd SOLDIER:

“Oh, just regular GI work clothes.”

4th INTERVIEWER:

“We see pinned on your lapel here this white badge. Can you tell me what that is?”

4th SOLDIER:

“That’s a film badge to determine the amount of radiation you’ve received in the area.”

4th INTERVIEWER:

“And they can tell from that if you’ve received a lethal dose? Is that right?”

4th SOLDIER:

“That’s right. That’s right. They can.”

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• FOOTAGE ON THE INCIDENT IN ST. GEORGE, UTAH

1st ANNOUNCER:

“If you were driving from Los Angeles to Salt Lake City on US 91, you’d pass through St. George, Utah. Just a short way from the Nevada test site 140 miles to the west. “

2nd ANNOUNCER;

“Ladies and gentlemen, we interrupt this program to bring you important news. Word has just been received from the Atomic Energy Commission that, due to a change in wind direction, the residue from this morning’s atomic detonation is drifting in the direction of St. George. It is suggested that everyone remain indoors for one hour or until further notice. There is no danger. This is simply routine Atomic Energy Commission safety procedure. Parents need not be alarmed about children at school. No recesses outdoors will be permitted.”

 1st ANNOUNCER:

“And as the people of St. George took cover, it was natural that some of them had questions about atomic tests.”

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• US ARMY FILM ABOUT THE ATOMIC BOMB

VOICE-OVERS:

“What is the atomic bomb?

“Why do we have to test bombs?”

“How little an amount of radiation will cause how many mutations?”

US ARMY OFFICIAL:

“Never before have so many known so little about a subject so big and so important.  The capabilities of most weapons are pretty well understood. But when it comes to atomic explosions, the guessing game starts.

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“Alright, let’s take a few minutes right now to get acquainted with an A-bomb. Meet Test Abel.”

NARRATOR:

“A submarine bomb exploded in a harbor might affect a city.”

 “The affected area would be a poor picnic site, but might be entered briefly or passed through quickly with a varying degree of risk.”

“Risk is something the military doesn’t have a corner on. Occupational hazards are accepted in a matter-of-fact manner in civilian life.“

“Risk is part of the pattern of daily routine. “

“Some of the falsehoods circulated about radiation effects are trivial, but upsetting. They’re beamed right at one’s self-esteem.”

RADIO VOICE

“…and will eventually result in a race of bald-headed people. Just imagine it. Imagine yourself with no hair. They’ll call you ‘Old Skinhead…Old Chrome Dome.’ And that’s not all radioactivity will do. It will…”

NARRATOR:

“Enough exposure to radiation will cause loss of hair. The treatment, if you insist, would be symptomatic – a toupee. But the condition will only be temporary. Your hair would come back. Same color. Same cowlick.”

“Which puts the finger squarely upon one of the major fallacies in the public attitude toward atomic weapons. It’s the fallacy of devoting 85% of one’s worrying capacity to an agent that constitutes only about 15% of an atomic bomb’s destroying potential.  And that’s unsound. Doesn’t fit.

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• NUCLEAR DEFENSE AGENCY FILM

NARRATOR:

“There are those few who loudly maintain that there’s no actual threat to the free world at all, certainly none that can justify either nuclear testing or nuclear armament. The opposite viewpoint holds that the development of our nuclear power has been an absolutely necessary protection against communist hostility and nuclear threats. In this view, the fallout casualties, if any, will be seen as those of unidentified soldiers in the service of humanity; unknown soldiers in a war which has not struck.”

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• 4-H CLUB FILM

CLUB LEADER:

“We’re going to be talking about nuclear energy and the kinds of things that can happen in an atomic emergency.”

“And we do this not to worry you or frighten you but really we’ve got to admit we live in an atomic age. There is an atomic bomb so we have to be aware of this and know what to do in case an emergency happens,”

1st GIRL:

“If there will be a need to spend two weeks in a fallout shelter, we have packed our survival kit. For the food supply, we have packed a variety of fruits, soups, evaporated milk, vegetables, napkins…”

2nd GIRL:

“The purpose of our demonstration today is to show you the actual preparation of one of the meals which was prepared in a modern-day cave.”

1st GIRL:

“One noon meal consisted of the following food: canned chicken, peas, Irish potatoes, tomato juice…” 

BOY:

“My poster is on the defenses against fallout. If you’re caught outside during a nuclear explosion, decontamination may be necessary. You may have to burn or bury all your clothes and food, and afterward, you should wash thoroughly.”

CLUB LEADER:

“John, let me interrupt you here just a moment. I have some film here that I think will describe what might happen and we’ll describe a little about the atom. So, Joey, why don’t you catch the lights and we’ll try it.”

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• DUCK AND COVER – US CIVIL DEFENSE FILM

BERT THE TURTLE [THE DUCK AND COVER SONG] (Song by Dick ‘Two Ton’ Baker [1953])

There was a turtle by the name of Bert

And Bert the Turtle was very alert

When danger threatened him he never got hurt

He knew just what to do

He’d duck and cover, duck and cover…”

 

NARRATOR:

“Now, you and I don’t have shells to crawl into like Bert the Turtle, so we have to cover up in our own way.”

“Paul and Patty know this. No matter where they go or what they do, they always try to remember what to do if the atom bomb explodes right then. It’s a bomb! Duck and cover!”

“Here’s Tony going to his cub scout meeting. Tony knows the bomb can explode any time of the year, day or night. Duck and cover! Atta boy, Tony! That flash means act fast.”

“Sundays, holidays, vacation time, we must be ready every day , all the time, to do the right thing if the atomic bomb explodes. Duck and cover!”

“That’s the first thing to do. Duck and cover.”

“First you duck, then you cover. Duck and cover tight. Duck and cover under the table.”

BERT THE TURTLE [THE DUCK AND COVER SONG] (Song by Dick ‘Two Ton’ Baker [1953]) (Continued)

“He did what we all must learn to do

You and you and you and you

You and you and you and you

You and you and you and you

You and you and you and you

Duck and cover.”

BERT THE TURLTE:

“Remember what to do friends. Now tell me right out loud. What are you supposed to do when you see the flash?”

CHORUS:

“Duck and cover!”

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• SYMPOSIUM ON THE HYDROGEN BOMB

WOMAN IN THE AUDIENCE:

“Question!”

MODERATOR:

“Yes.”

WOMAN IN THE AUDIENCE:

“How far do you have to be from the blast to live through it?”

MODERATOR:

“Well, let’s take a 20-megaton surface burst…”

 

MODERATOR:

“You would have a good chance of surviving if you were more than 12 miles (20 kilometers) from the point of detonation.”

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• INTERVIEW WITH COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY PROFESSOR SEYMOUR MELMAN

Dr. Seymour Melman, an economist who taught industrial engineering at Columbia, was a leading advocate of disarmament for nearly half a century. He opposed nuclear weapons almost from their inception.

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SEYMOUR MELMAN;

“A bomb equivalent to 20 million tons of TNT would cause an intense fire called a firestorm in an area around 2,000 square miles (5,180 square kilometers) around the center of the blast. And in such an area, it would be futile – desperately futile – to construct what are called fallout shelters.”

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• PUBLIC INFORMATION FILM

 

CARTOON PROFESSOR:

“This man, like thousands of others around the country, is suffering from a dread disease called nuclearosis. The symptoms: nuclear blindness – all he can see is a mushroom cloud, he is blinded from the fear of it, deaf from the sound of it. There is a short circuit in his brain. He can only think of the awfulness of the nuclear bomb.”

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• INTERVIEW WITH COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY PROFESSOR SEYMOUR MELMAN (Continued)

SEYMOUR MELMAN:

“We ought to learn something from the Second World War in this respect, and the bombing there, even by Second World War bombs in Hamburg, Tokyo, and other cities showed that shelters became centers for incinerating or asphyxiating the people who were in them.”

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• PUBLIC INFORMATION FILM (CONTINUED)

 CARTOON PROFESSOR:

“A fallout shelter in your basement will give adequate shielding from radioactive fallout. Ah, he’s finally getting the message. Are you?”

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• UNIVERSAL NEWSREEL ON BOMB SHELTERS

NARRATOR:

“A new housing development near Denver, Colorado shows the nation’s first model homes with built-in fallout shelters. The room is designed with an atomic war in mind.

“But behind each eight-inch thick, reinforced concrete wall, it may prove to be just what the harried housewife is looking for when life with the kids gets too hectic.”

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• INTERVIEW WITH COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY PROPFESSOR MARIO SALVADORI

Professor Mario G. Salvadori worked to link the fields of structural engineering and architecture and served as a consultant on the Manhattan Project. 

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INTERVIEWER:

“You don’t think shelters are a deterrent to a nuclear war either?”

MARIO SALVADORI;

“On the contrary, I believe that psychologically they will push both us and the Russians into thinking more of having a war.”

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• FOOTAGE OF “THE KITCHEN DEBATE” FEATURING US VICE PRESIDENT RICHARD NIXON AND SOVIET PREMIER NIKITA KRUSHCHEV

The Kitchen Debate was a series of impromptu exchanges (through interpreters) between then U.S. Vice President Richard Nixon and Soviet Premier Nikita Krushchev at the opening of the American National Exhibition at Sokolniki Park in Moscow on July 24, 1959 where the two debated the merits of capitalism versus communism.

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RICHARD NIXON:

“There are some instances where you may be ahead of us, for example, in the development of the thrust of your rockets for the investigation of outer space. There may be some instances, for example color television, where we’re ahead of you. But in order for both of us to benefit…”

NIKITA KRUSHCHEV:

(wildly gesticulating and dismissing Nixon’s statement in Russian after hearing the translation)

RICHARD NIXON:

“You never concede anything.” 

NIKITA KRUSHCHEV:

“We wish you success in that you show the actual possibilities of America. And we will be able to say ‘Here are the possibilities of America.’ How long does it exist? How many years? 300? 300? One hundred fifty years of independence? Then we will say that America exists 150 years – here is its level. We are 42 years, not quite. Another seven years and we will be on the same level as America. Then in the future we might go ahead and overtake you at the crossroads,”

RICHARD NIXON:

“This increase in communications will teach us some things and it will teach you some things, too. Because after all, you don’t know everything,”

NIKITA KRUSHCHEV:

“If I don’t know everything, then I would say that you know absolutely nothing about communism – nothing except fear of it.”

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• FATHER L. C. McHUGH SPEAKING ON PROTECTING ONE’S FAMILY IN A BOMB SHELTER

FATHER McHUGH:

“Let’s say you’ve got your family in your shelter. The attack is on. A question might come up of admitting anyone over and above the number for whom the shelter is designed. I say we should rely on the best potential judgment that the father, or the one responsible for the shelter, can make in the circumstances. But I say let him think twice before he admits the needy stranger if admitting the needy stranger is going to cut down the chances of survival of the group that’s already there. And then that final point. Can a man have protective devices in order to protect his family once they are in the shelter from let’s say strangers who try to use a crowbar to get in? I’d say, from what I have been talking about, the matter of self-defense, it would be wise for a man to at least weigh the possibility of putting some protective devices in his shelter together with the other elements of his survival kit.”

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• FILM OF MAN EMERGING FROM A BOMB SHELTER

INTERVIEWER:

“All right, you’ve been down there eight to ten days, you’ve come out, and you’ve found that half or three-quarters of Los Angeles has been destroyed. Well how are you going to continue to live?”

MAN IN BOMB SHELTER:

“Well the first thing we have to recognize is that of half of Los Angeles is destroyed maybe eighty to ninety percent of the people will be dead and there will be fewer mouths to feed, and those of us who will survive will have more water and food to divide up.”

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• THIRTEEN WOMEN (AND ONLY ONE MAN IN TOWN) (Song by Bill Haley and His Comets [1954])

“Last night I was dreamin’

Dreamed about the H-Bomb

Well the bomb-a went off and I was caught

I was the only man on the ground

There was-a 13 women and only one man in town

Thirteen women and only one man in town

And as funny as it may be

The one and only man in town was me

With 13 women and me the only man around.”

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• THIRTEEN WOMEN (AND ONLY ONE MAN IN TOWN) (Song by Bill Haley and His Comets [1954]) (Continued)

“I had two gals every morning

Seein’ that I was well fed

And believ-a you me, one sweetened my tea

While another one buttered my bread.”

 

ATOMIC LOVE (Song by Little Caesar and the Red Callender Sextette [1953])

“Boooom!

Something exploded down inside

And rushed tears up in my eyes

Oh yes, I have that funny feeling

I guess it’s my atomic love for you.”

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• VICE-PRESIDENT RICHARD NIXON SPEAKING ON READINESS OF US DEFENSES

 

RICHARD NIXON:

“Our artillery and our tactical Air Force in the Pacific are now equipped at this moment with atomic explosives which can and will be used on military targets with precision and effectiveness.”

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• NEWSREEL ABOUT MENTAL HEALTH WEEK

ANNOUNCER:

“On the steps of the nation’s Capitol the bell announcing the opening of Mental Health week is rung by Vice President Nixon and Senator Smathers of Florida, characterizing mental health as the nation’s number one problem. The Vice President says that the ringing of the bell throughout the nation will be a reminder of suffering Americans.”

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• ATOM BOMB BABY (Song by The Five Stars [1957])

“Atom bomb baby, little atom bomb

I want her in my wigwam

She’s just the way I want her to be

A million times hotter than TNT

Atom bomb baby, little atom bomb!”

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CONELRAD (Control of Electromagnetic Radiation) was a method of emergency broadcasting to the American public in the event of enemy attack during the Cold War. It was intended to serve two purposes; to prevent Soviet bombers from homing in on American cities by using radio or TV stations as beacons, and to provide essential civil defense information.

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• FALLOUT SHELTER (Song by Mike and Bernie Winters [1961])

“20 megatons is the size of the boom

And if they let it go, I’ll feel no doom

Let the cats run about, helter-skelter

I’m gonna live, live, live in my fallout shelter.”

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VOICE-OVER:

“By all means, provide some tranquilizers to ease the strain and monotony of life in a shelter. A bottle of 100 should be adequate for a family of four. Tranquilizers are not a narcotic and are not habit-forming.”

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• NUCLEAR ATTACK SCENARIO

 

TV ANNOUNCER:

“And by the way, do you know exactly what your family would do if an attack came? Say at 10:00 o’clock tomorrow morning. It’s a good question, isn’t it?”

(Two actors in a romantic radio show can be heard playing the roles of lovers George and Lucy until interrupted by a government official.)

EMERGENCY ANNOUNCER:

“We interrupt our normal program in the interests of security and civil defense measures as requested by the United States Government.”

RADIO VOICES:

“Attention! Attention! This is an official Civil Defense warning. This is NOT a test. The United States is under nuclear attack. Take cover immediately in your area fallout shelter. Repeat. The United States is under nuclear attack.”

“This is an official civil defense broadcast. Enemy aircraft are over Canada and headed this way. Normal broadcasting has been discontinued until after this emergency has passed.”

“Repeat. The United States is under nuclear attack. Take cover immediately in your area fallout shelter.”

TV ANNOUNCER;

“We repeat, The nation is under nuclear attack. This is an extreme emergency. You are urged to remain calm.”

RADIO VOICES:

“Proceed to your designated shelter without delay.”

“This is an official Civil Defense warning. This is NOT a test. The United States is under nuclear attack. Take cover immediately in your area fallout shelter.”

“Repeat. The United States is under nuclear attack. Take cover immediately in your area fallout shelter.”

 

MOTHER IN FALLOUT SHELTER:

“Now children, I want you to sit down here against the wall. That’s it. Now crouch down tight up against it. “

FATHER IN FALLOUT SHELTER:

“Now listen, kids. If they’re dropping an atomic bomb, it may go off any second now. Whatever happens, I’ll give the signal when it’s all right for us to get up. If there’s an explosion, we’ll wait about a minute after it’s all over, then we’ll go upstairs and take a look around and see if it’s all right for us to go upstairs and clean up.”

 

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Hiroshima after the blast

FATHER IN FALLOUT SHELTER:

“Children, you’d better clear up this broken glass and all this debris. All in all, I’d say we’ve been very lucky around here. Nothing to do now but wait for orders from the authorities and relax.”

 The Atomic Cafe was

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• THIS COLD WAR WITH YOU (Song by Floyd Tillman [1949])

“The sun goes down and leaves me sad and blue

The iron curtain falls on this cold war with you

Though you won’t speak and I won’t speak that’s true

Two stubborn people with a cold war to go through

 

Oh why, oh, why should love ever come

To couples, like you and me

Whose cold, cold wars are never done

And whose hearts just can’t be free

Oh let’s do right or let’s just say we’re through

I just can’t stand another cold, cold war with you

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Oh why, oh, why should love ever come

To couples, like you and me

Whose cold, cold wars are never done

And whose hearts just can’t be free

Now let’s do right, or let’s just say we’re through

I just can’t stand another cold, cold war with you”

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THE END? 

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 DOWNLOAD A PDF VERSION OF THE ATOMIC CAFE TRANSCRIPT (PART III) HERE:

Atomic Cafe Transcript (Part III)

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